Trendy fitness apps might raise the risk of injury, claims an A-list trainer.

London-based PT Dalton Wong, whose clients have included Jennifer Lawrence, Kit Harington and Olivia Colman, warned people are often overly focused on gaining a ‘stupid score that means nothing in real life’.

As a result, he said users could easily hurt themselves by pushing too far. 

Advocates of AI fitness apps, such as Whoop and Freeletics, say they make healthy lifestyles more accessible by letting people track their progress in their own homes.

Many integrate motion tracking technology to assess movement and exercise form, offering instant feedback and corrections. Others use predictive analytics to forecast and set fitness goals by analysing past performance data. 

London -based PT Dalton Wong (pictured) warned people are often overly focused on gaining a 'stupid score that means nothing in real life'. As a result, he said users could easily hurt themselves by pushing too far

London -based PT Dalton Wong (pictured) warned people are often overly focused on gaining a ‘stupid score that means nothing in real life’. As a result, he said users could easily hurt themselves by pushing too far

Some AI-powered apps even allow users to earn points or coins for completing workouts and rank their performance on leaderboards giving them the opportunity to move up into different leagues. Often they track body's data including heart rate, blood oxygen levels and calories burned. Mr Wong, whose clients have included Jennifer Lawrence (pictured), criticised the 'gamification of fitness', however

Some AI-powered apps even allow users to earn points or coins for completing workouts and rank their performance on leaderboards giving them the opportunity to move up into different leagues. Often they track body’s data including heart rate, blood oxygen levels and calories burned. Mr Wong, whose clients have included Jennifer Lawrence (pictured), criticised the ‘gamification of fitness’, however

He told The Times: 'It's just a workout. There's nothing personal about it. When you're fatigued you have other issues happening in your body that AI can't and won't pick up.' Pictured, Jennifer Lawrence, a PT client of Mr Wong

He told The Times: ‘It’s just a workout. There’s nothing personal about it. When you’re fatigued you have other issues happening in your body that AI can’t and won’t pick up.’ Pictured, Jennifer Lawrence, a PT client of Mr Wong

Some even allow users to earn points or coins for completing workouts and rank their performance on leaderboards giving them the opportunity to move up into different leagues.

Often they track body’s data including heart rate, blood oxygen levels and calories burned. 

Mr Wong criticised the ‘gamification of fitness’, however.

He told The Times: ‘I’m training at a level that I need to be just so I can complete the gamification of my app, sacrificing my health in the process.

‘Your pain might be at a ten, but the app says keep moving through it, you’re fine — then you can injure yourself.

‘When you’re talking to me and I see you straining, I’ll say “okay, maybe we should calm down”.’

He added: ‘It’s just a workout. There’s nothing personal about it. When you’re fatigued you have other issues happening in your body that AI can’t and won’t pick up.’ 

Studies have long shown over-exercising can trigger muscle breakdown, raise the risk of bone fractures or even developing potentially fatal heart problems.

Mr Wong advised Brits with known ailments to first consult a physio or osteopath to check which exercises they should avoid on such apps. Pictured right with activewear CEO Anjhe Mules and chef Jason Marcus in 2018

Mr Wong advised Brits with known ailments to first consult a physio or osteopath to check which exercises they should avoid on such apps. Pictured right with activewear CEO Anjhe Mules and chef Jason Marcus in 2018

One report by BCC Research estimated the global market for fitness apps was worth $15billion (£11.8billion) in 2022, with it forecast to jump to $34.3billion (£26.9billion) by 2027. Pictured, Kit Harington, a PT client of Mr Wong

One report by BCC Research estimated the global market for fitness apps was worth $15billion (£11.8billion) in 2022, with it forecast to jump to $34.3billion (£26.9billion) by 2027. Pictured, Kit Harington, a PT client of Mr Wong

Studies have long shown over-exercising can trigger muscle breakdown, raise the risk of bone fractures or even developing potentially fatal heart problems. Pictured, Olivia Colman, a PT client of Mr Wong

Studies have long shown over-exercising can trigger muscle breakdown, raise the risk of bone fractures or even developing potentially fatal heart problems. Pictured, Olivia Colman, a PT client of Mr Wong

Excessive exercise also risks elevating levels of cortisol, the body’s primary stress hormone.

Mr Wong advised Brits with known ailments to first consult a physio or osteopath to check which exercises they should avoid on such apps.

It comes as one report by BCC Research estimated the global market for fitness apps was worth $15billion (£11.8billion) in 2022, with it forecast to jump to $34.3billion (£26.9billion) by 2027. 

Apps using AI, including Aaptiv, FitnessAI, Fitbod, Freeletics, VI Trainer, and Whoop, track workout movements and offer instant feedback and suggestions. 

Often they track body’s data including heart rate, blood oxygen levels and calories burned. 

London-based AI fitness software firm Magic AI this month reported that it had been inundated with orders.

Its Magic Mirror, a touch-screen mirror that plays videos of an AI-powered trainer which guides users through workouts, cannot ship to new customers until March due to demand. 

Experts have suggested a rising number of people are asking popular AI chatbot ChatGPT to devise workouts for them.

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