It’s always impressive to look your absolute best. But when you’re in your 60s and still look fit as a fiddle, that’s truly something to be noticed. We are here today to share six strength exercises a 69-year-old instructor does to stay fit and strong, so get ready to take notes!

The person we’re spotlighting today is Steve Krum, a coach for Row House in Denver, Colorado. He tells us, “Strength training in my opinion is the ‘Fountain of Youth’ because it combats the aging process, especially muscle atrophy and bone density. The great thing about strength exercises is that the metabolism is raised during the exercise and continues for hours post-exercise due to the process of rebuilding of the muscle.”

Krum also compares strength training to The Wizard of Oz‘s “Tin Man,” because the process of moving lubricates your tendons, joints, and other tissues, similar to the oil can that’s used by the Tin Man. Krum explains, “When our bodies are naturally tightening up and we are losing flexibility, strength exercises help with range of motion, movement and  blood flow.”

He’s a major fan of the saying, “Use it or lose it,” and after speaking with Krum, so are we! Keep reading to learn more, and when you’re finished, be sure to check out 8 Tips for Boosting Muscle Growth After 50, According to a Trainer.

Rowing

Steve Krum rowing
Steve Krum

In Krum’s opinion, rowing is the #1 best total-body exercise in the world. “Not only is it a great cardiovascular workout, but it is a fantastic strength workout,” he explains. “It uses 86% of the muscles in our bodies in one complete stroke! This is so important for my 69-year-old body because maintaining muscle mass is a huge priority to me.”

Krum rows five to six days each week of which two to three days he teaches rowing.

Stair Climbing

illustration of stair climber
Shutterstock

Similar to rowing, stair climbing provides great maintenance for your hamstrings, calves, quads, and glutes. “Muscle atrophy is an issue in aging men. Due to the stress, lower back torque, and impact of heavy weight lifting ie., squats, leg press, deadlift, etc., I have found that stair climbing is a great and safe substitute for me. It also is very cardiovascular.”

Krum climbs stairs two times every week, which means around 2,000 stairs each time he does it. “Usually when driving home from one of the stair climbing locations, my legs are shaking,” he adds.

Pushups

pushups
Steve Krum

There’s lots of goodness in a classic, old-fashioned pushup that puts your body weight to work. Krum typically performs three sets, totaling 200 reps, which he does two times a week.

Start in a high plank with your hands shoulder-distance apart. Bend your elbows, and lower your chest toward the floor. Then, push your body back up to the start position while keeping a tight core.

Bench Dips

bench dip
Steve Krum

Similar to pushups, Krum performs bench dips using his body weight and a workout bench as he aims to maintain a full range of motion and solid form. He performs 200 reps of bench dips twice a week.

Place your hands atop a workout bench, and extend your legs out in front of you. Bend both elbows to lower your body. Lower until your arms become parallel to the floor, then press back up to the start position.

Ab Routine

bicycle crunches
Steve Krum

What’s better than sticking to a regular ab routine to ensure you’re giving your body and six-pack proper maintenance? “I have a circuit comprised of bodyweight exercises, [including] scullers, boxers, bicycles, planks, leg raises, and other sit-up-type of movements,” Krum shares.

Lat Pulldowns

illustration of man doing lat pulldowns
Shutterstock

Last but not least, Krum swears by the dumbbell lat pulls or classic lat pulldowns. He aims to perform them two times a week. The lat pulldown is great when you want to build up your back muscles and strength.

To perform lat pulldowns, place your hands shoulder-width apart with your palms facing away from you. Lean back slightly as you pull the bar down toward your chest. Use control to bring the bar back up.

Alexa Mellardo

Alexa is the Mind + Body Deputy Editor of Eat This, Not That!, overseeing the M+B channel and delivering compelling fitness, wellness, and self-care topics to readers. Read more about Alexa
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